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Posted in Conclusion

Conclusion: Yes, tweens should have their own spaces

1436896367422Just as tweens are transitioning from childhood into young adulthood, libraries can provide a space and resources for youth to transition from the library’s children’s area to the teen area. Tween spaces can help to increase the library’s circulation of tween materials, ensure that young people don’t stop coming to the library because they don’t feel comfortable in the children’s or teen area, provide tweens with an opportunity to develop leadership skills by participating in a Tween Advisory Board, and give tweens a special space to read, relax, learn, and create! Promote lifelong library users by creating this important space just for tweens!

Image retrieved from http://static1.squarespace.com/static/54e7ac67e4b08db9da80620d/t/55a54c54e4b031e961109f72/1436896367422/

Please take a moment to write your thoughts in the Comments section below.

  • What do you think – should public libraries have separate tween spaces?

 

  • What would you have in your ideal tween library space?

 

Posted in Separate spaces?

Is a separate tween space right for your library?

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When considering if your public library can benefit from a tween space:

  • Conduct a community analysis and a needs assessment
  • Analyze circulation statistics of tween-appropriate books and magazines
  • Ask tweens questions
  • Observe their use of the library
  • Participate in formal research studies
  • Create a Tween Advisory Board
  • Consult other librarians

References:

Disher, W. (2014). Crash course in collection development. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, LLC.

Faris, C. (2009). Betwixt and between: Tweens in the library. Children & Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Service to Children, 7(1), 43-45. Retrieved from http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=40507767&site=ehost-live

Goforth Gregory, J. (2015). Stuck in the middle. American Libraries, 46(5), 42-45. Retrieved From http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=102654430&site=ehost-live

Marshall, Sherry. (2014, April 19). Tiverton Public Library tween collection development . Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gg2f3Jir9pg

Meyers, E. M., Fisher, K. E., & Marcoux, E. (2009). Making sense of an information world: The everyday-life information behavior of preteens. Library Quarterly, 79(3), 301-341. Retrieved from http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=43205389&site=ehost-live

Moss Struckmeyer, Amanda. (2012). Reaching tweens. Children & Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Service to Children, 10(2), 36-38. Retrieved from http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=79201332&site=ehost-live

WITTEVEEN, A. (2015). What do tweens want? School Library Journal, 61(10), 30-32. Retrieved from http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=110090318&site=ehost-live

Image retrieved from http://www.slj.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Felde_Maryland-kids-300×225.jpg

Posted in Separate spaces?

Why tweens SHOULD have separate spaces in public libraries

tweens-bannerTweens can benefit from having a designated space just for them in public libraries because:

  • Tweens (typically defines as age 8-12) have information needs and interests that are unique from other age ranges.
  • They’re too old for the children’s area but not old enough for the teen area.
  • Their needs are often overlooked by libraries, who focus on younger and older children.
  • Promote lifelong library user populations by providing services from childhood through adulthood, rather than having a gap in services for this age range.
  • Engage parents who bring tweens to programs just for them.
  • Demonstrate to public officials and educators the library’s value in serving this population.

References:

Bean Thompson, Sarah. (2014). Don’t forget the tweens. Retrieved from http://publiclibrariesonline.org/2014/01/dont-forget-the-tweens/

Goforth Gregory, J. (2015). Stuck in the middle. American Libraries, 46(5), 42-45. Retrieved From http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=102654430&site=ehost-live

Meyers, E. M., Fisher, K. E., & Marcoux, E. (2009). Making sense of an information world: The everyday-life information behavior of preteens. Library Quarterly, 79(3), 301-341. Retrieved from http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=43205389&site=ehost-live

Moss Struckmeyer, Amanda. (2012). Reaching tweens. Children & Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Service to Children, 10(2), 36-38. Retrieved from http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=79201332&site=ehost-live

PISARSKI, A. Y. (2014). Finding a place for the tween. Children & Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Service to Children, 12(3), 13-16. Retrieved from http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=98051849&site=ehost-live

WITTEVEEN, A. (2015). What do tweens want? School Library Journal, 61(10), 30-32. Retrieved from http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=110090318&site=ehost-live

Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA). (2016a). About YALSA. Retrieved from

http://www.ala.org/yalsa/aboutyalsa

Image retrieved from http://www.orilliapubliclibrary.ca/en/inc/resources/tweens-banner.jpg

Posted in Separate spaces?

Why tweens should NOT have separate spaces in public libraries

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A variety of concerns have been raised about having separate spaces for tweens in public libraries:

  • Is there actually a need for a separate tween space?
  • Space limitations might not provide for a separate tween space.
  • Staff will need to be reassigned from other duties, or additional staff will need to be hired.
  • Expenses related to creating a new space, such as purchasing furniture and technology, adding to the middle grade book collection, programming costs, and staffing.
  • Children’s and teen spaces already exist in many libraries, and carving out additional areas for target populations might reduce the space available for all patrons to use.
  • Separate spaces might imply to children that they are not welcome to use materials in the areas designated for children or young adults outside of their age range.
  • Tween’s preferences change so frequently that it is difficult for staff to know what to provide and have concerns that offerings in a tween area may become quickly outdated.

References:

Anjackson. Is there a need for distinct tween materials, sections, services, statistics? [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://anjackson.net/zombse/062013%20Libraries%20&%20Information%20Science/static/questions/403.html

 

Goforth Gregory, J. (2015). Stuck in the middle. American Libraries, 46(5), 42-45. Retrieved

From http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=102654430&site=ehost-live

 

Kropp, Lisa. (2016a). Tween spaces – wants or needs? Retrieved from

http://www.alsc.ala.org/blog/2016/06/tween-spaces-wants-needs/

 

Watkins, Ally. (2016, March 29). On tween programming. Retrieved from

http://www.alsc.ala.org/blog/2016/03/on-tween-programming/

 

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